Giant Lightning Bolts Scan the Solar System for Powerful Explosions!

The source of the massive lightning that has penetrated our solar system has been identified by scientists. Lightning detection can help understand gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful explosions in the universe.

Earth is regularly exposed to light and tiny gamma rays on an almost daily basis. However, large flashes occur less frequently, such as the recently examined 200415A GRB, which carries with it energy more powerful than our sun.

The flash appears to come from an unusually strong neutron star known as a magnetar, scientists say in a discovery published in Nature Astronomy.

Giant lightning bolts scan the solar system for powerful explosions!

“Our sun is just an ordinary star. When it dies, it grows and turns into a red giant star.” It will then collapse into a tiny dense star known as a white dwarf, “Soebur Razzaque of the University of Johannesburg, who led the research.

“But the stars, which are much bigger than the sun, play a different game.”

Instead, they explode in a supernova, leaving behind tiny dense stars called neutron stars. They are small but so thick that a full spoon weighs tons.

These stars are the creators of the strongest explosions in the universe.

The investigation only started in April last year – on the morning of April 15 – when a giant thunderbolt crossed Mars. A network of satellites, including the International Space Station, discovered the incident and triggered research published today.

The 200415A GRB eruption was not the first to be found on Earth. But that was unusual in many ways, including the fact that it had become closer to us than usual.

This means that in the 140 milliseconds they’ve saved, the researchers can gather massive amounts of data to get a much better picture of the previous visitors who arrived 16 years ago.

And when investigators were able to pinpoint the cause, they found that this too was unusual: it came from a magnet. There are only 30 known objects in our entire galaxy, made up of tens of thousands of neutron stars and can be a thousand times more magnetic than ordinary neutron stars.

The galaxy where lightning originates is outside our galaxy, but only on a galactic scale. That’s only 11.4 million light-years.

Scientists hope to find more and examine them with more detailed data. This not only explains the process that made the Big Bang possible but also uses it as a means of understanding the history of our world.

Source of information: www.independent.co.uk

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